Unity of the bible exegetical

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For starters: Review the New Literary Relationships (NLR) chart, class notes, and Dr. Story’s videos on Inductive Bible Study as necessary.

1. Read Matthew 24:3-14.several times, “observing” as you did on your first exegetical assignment. Seek to observe relations between clauses, sentences, and paragraphs. Record ten of your most significant observations, covering the entire chapter. In addition to the review material above, consult the slide that was presented in class that elaborated on “poor,” “good,” and “great” observations. Important: For at least five of your observations, include the “material” contained in the observation, i.e. biography, geography, chronology, history, or ideology (top of first page of your NLR chart). You may also consult the explanation and specific examples provided in “Holman’s Principles of Bible Study,” pp. 35-37 (available via “Course Resources” and “Dr. Holman’s Materials”).
2. For at least five of your observations, provide an interpretive question. Refer to the second⁢ page of the NLR chart. You may also consult the discussion/examples in “Holman’s Principles of Bible Study,” pp. 43-45 (as well as ch. 5). Note: You do NOT need to identify the “type” (Type A, Type B, etc.) of interpretive question listed on the NLR chart. Merely use these as guidance on how to go about determining an interpretive question.
3. Write a one paragraph (5-7 sentence) application based on ONE of your interpretive questions. You may consult “Holman’s Principles of Bible Study,” chs. 6-8, and particularly pp. 52-54, as your guide. Do your best to answer your interpretive question based on your thorough reading and study of the passage and your observations. Your one paragraph application should include: (a) a brief answer to your interpretive question; (b) a theoretical/broad application; and (c) a practical/specific application.

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