Politics, Governance and Development policy Programme

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Politics, Governance and Development policy Programme

Assignment 1: Research proposal – 2000 words

Pathway themes: The Political Economy of Land in Uganda. Women’s land rights in Uganda.

Assignment title: The impact of the implementation of the land registration on women’s rights in Uganda. (I have created this title myself, feel free to change and amend it for the better and more clear and specific one).  

 

During the research visit to Uganda, students will explore issues related to the political economy of land in Uganda. Students will have the opportunity to focus their fieldwork on various aspects of the land question in Uganda, for example: decentralisation and customary authority; women’s land rights; agricultural investment; or competition over land in a post conflict setting.

Through the DfID Political Economy Analysis framework, students will critically engage with the drivers and constraints of land policy in a context of chronic poverty and marginalisation.

 

You need to use the literature review to identify different perspectives within the literature and to derive a clear research focus for your fieldwork.

The topics like women’s land rights or land and productivity are too broad and general. You will need to focus in on one particular element for your proposal. So you could, for example, examine how inheritance practices combine with land tenure to produce gender inequality or whether land registration (as a means of enhancing tenure security and productivity) is implemented or not and why.

The methodology needs to flow from this specific research focus and needs to be something feasible in the time we have in Uganda and in light of what we already know about our itinerary (i.e. Kampala – Gulu – Buganda). So, for example, carrying out a survey to conduct quantitative data analysis is not going to be possible.

Discussion of existing literature should be reserved for the literature review section – the methodology should be used to lay out your primary research plans – who you would like to interview, what information you think they would be likely to be able to provide and how this relates to your research focus and what sort of questions you would ask them.

 

In this assignment you are asked to prepare a research proposal for your time in Uganda. The proposal must draw on your research theme and identify a specific focus for your time in Uganda. What will you find out? How will you find it out? Why is this important to understand? All these question should be answered clearly and concisely within a research proposal. Most methods text books have a section on writing research proposals. The following structure and word counts are meant as a guide:

 

Title: The impact of the implementation of the land registration on women’s rights in Uganda.

 

Introduction: A concise introduction that ’sets the scene’ for your proposed topic and outlines the research problem you are addressing. (Around 200 words)

 

Literature review: A critical review of relevant literature. Your proposal should review the literature and provide a clear rationale for your research. Broadly speaking, it needs to answer the following questions: What does the literature say about this topic? What are the important themes and problems identified in the literature? How has this topic been addressed in the past? Why is your research and topic important? How will you approach the topic in your research? Your literature review should establish clear, logical links between the wider research and your own research aim and objectives or research questions. (Around 1100 words)

 

Aim and objectives or research questions: You will need to provide one clear and succinct aim and several objectives that relate to your aim. It is important that the aim and objectives are derived from your analysis of the literature and realistic in terms of what can be achieved during the research. These can also be phrased as research questions if you prefer. There is no need to have both aims/objectives and research questions. (Around 100-200 words)

 

Methodology: This section describes your proposed research methodology and methods of data collection and connects them to the aim and objectives or research questions. It should explain your overall research strategy and detail what data you will collect, how you will collect it and how you will analyse the data. Be realistic. Any limitations of the study should be mentioned. (Around 500 words)

References

 

 

Core readings and suggested references:

Boone, C., 2007. Property and constitutional order: Land tenure reform and the future of the African state. African Affairs, 106 (425), 557–586.

Manji, A., 2001. Land reform in the shadow of the state: The implementation of new land laws in sub-saharan Africa. Third World Quarterly, 22 (3), 327–342.

Green, E.D., 2006. Ethnicity and the politics of land tenure reform in central Uganda.

Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, 44, 370–388.

Joireman, S.F., 2007. Enforcing new property rights in sub-Saharan Africa: The Ugandan Constitution and the 1998 land act. Comparative Politics, 39 (4), 463–480.

Kandel, M., 2016. Struggling Over Land in Post-Conflict Uganda. African Affairs, adw001.

Tripp, A.M., 2004. Women’s movements, customary law, and land rights in Africa: the case of Uganda. African Studies Quarterly, 7 (4), 1–19.

van Leeuwen, M., 2017. Localizing Land Governance, Strengthening the State: Decentralization and Land Tenure Security in Uganda. Journal of Agrarian Change, 17 (1), 208–227.

Schlager, E. and Ostrom, E., 1992. Property-rights regimes and natural resources: a conceptual analysis. Land Economics, 68 (3), 249–262.

Alden Wily, L., 2003. Governance and Land Relations: A Review of Decentralisation of Land Administration and Management in Africa. London: IIED. Available at: http://hubrural.org/IMG/pdf/iied_lt_wily.pdf

Berry, S., 2009. Property, authority and citizenship: Land claims, politics and the dynamics of social division in West Africa. Development and Change, 40 (1), 23–45.

Boone, C., 2014. Property and Political Order in Africa: Land Rights and the Structure of Conflict. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bruce, J.W., 1993. Do indigenous tenure systems constrain agricultural development? In: T.J.Bassett and D.E. Crummey, eds. Land in African agrarian systems. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 35–56.

Evers, S., Spierenburg, M., and Wels, H., 2005. Competing Jurisdictions: Settling Land Claims in Africa. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers.

Lund, C. and Boone, C., 2013. Land politics in Africa – Constituting authority over territory, property and persons. Africa, 83 (1).

Agarwal, B., 2003. Gender and Land Rights Revisited: Exploring New Prospects via the State, Family and Market. Journal of Agrarian Change, 3 (1–2), 184–224.

Claassens, A., 2013. Recent Changes in Women’s Land Rights and Contested Customary Law in South Africa. Journal of Agrarian Change, 13 (1), 71–92.

Doss, C.R., Kovarik, C., Peterman, A., Quisumbing, A.R., Bold, V.D., and Mara, 2013. Gender Inequalities in Ownership and Control of Land in Africa: Myths Versus Reality. IFPRI Discussion Paper, 1308.

Lastarria-Cornhiel, S., 1997. Impact of privatization on gender and property rights in Africa. World Development, 25 (8), 1317–1333.

Lavers, T., 2017. Land registration and gender equality in Ethiopia: How state-society relations influence the enforcement of institutional change. Journal of Agrarian Change, 17 (1), 188–207.

Leonard, R. and Toulmin, C., 2000. Women and land tenure: A review of the issues and challenges in Africa. London: IIED.

McAuslan, P., 2010. Personal reflections on drafting laws to improve women’s access to land: Is there a magic wand? Journal of Eastern African Studies, 4 (1), 114.

Razavi, S., 2003. Introduction: Agrarian Change, Gender and Land Rights. Journal of Agrarian Change, 3 (1–2), 2–32.

Razavi, S., 2007. Liberalisation and the debates on women’s access to land. Third World Quarterly,28 (8), 1479–1500.

Razavi, S., 2009. Engendering the political economy of agrarian change. The Journal of Peasant Studies, 36 (1), 197–226.

Whitehead, A. and Tsikata, D., 2003. Policy discourses on women’s land rights in sub–Saharan Africa: The implications of the re–turn to the customary. Journal of Agrarian Change, 3 (1–2),67–112.

Yngstrom, I., 2002. Women, Wives and Land Rights in Africa: Situating Gender Beyond the Household in the Debate Over Land Policy and Changing Tenure Systems. Oxford Development Studies, 30 (1), 21–40.

Ministry of Lands, Housing and Urban Development (2013). The Uganda National Land Policy. MoLHUD: Kampala. Available at:ttps://landportal.info/sites/landportal.info/files/

the_uganda_national_land_policy-_february_2013.pdf

Readings on land in Uganda

Bahiigwa, G., Rigby, D., and Woodhouse, P., 2005. Right target, wrong mechanism? Agricultural modernization and poverty reduction in Uganda. World Development, 33 (3), 481–496.

Coldham, S., 2000. Land Reform and Customary Rights: The Case of Uganda. Journal of African Law, 44 (1), 65–77.

Deininger, K., Ayalew Ali, D., and Yamano, T., 2006. Legal knowledge and economic development: The case of land rights in Uganda. World Bank.

Doss, C., Meinzen-Dick, R., and Bomuhangi, A., 2014. Who owns the land? Perspectives from rural Ugandans and implications for large-scale land acquisitions. Feminist economics, 20 (1), 76–100.

Green, E.D., 2006. Ethnicity and the politics of land tenure reform in central Uganda. Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, 44, 370–388.

Hunt, D., 2004. Unintended Consequences of Land Rights Reform: The Case of the 1998 Uganda Land Act. Development Policy Review, 22 (2), 173–191.

Joireman, S.F., 2007. Enforcing new property rights in sub-Saharan Africa: The Ugandan Constitution and the 1998 land act. Comparative Politics, 39 (4), 463–480.

Joireman, S.F., 2011. Where There is No Government: Enforcing Property Rights in Common Law Africa. Oxford University Press.

Joughin, J. and Kjær, A.M., 2010. The Politics of Agricultural Policy Reform: The Case of Uganda. Forum for Development Studies, 37 (1), 61–78.

Kandel, M., 2015. Politics from below? Small-, mid- and large-scale land dispossession in Teso, Uganda, and the relevance of scale. The Journal of Peasant Studies, 42 (3–4), 635–652.

Kandel, M., 2016. Struggling Over Land in Post-Conflict Uganda. African Affairs, 115 (459): 274-295.

Khadiagala, L., 2001. The Failure of Popular Justice in Uganda: Local Councils and Women’s Property Rights. Development and Change, 32 (1), 55–76.

van Leeuwen, M., 2017. Localizing Land Governance, Strengthening the State: Decentralization and Land Tenure Security in Uganda. Journal of Agrarian Change, 17 (1), 208–227.

Lyons, K. and Westoby, P., 2014. Carbon colonialism and the new land grab: Plantation forestry in Uganda and its livelihood impacts. Journal of Rural Studies, 36, 13–21.

Mabikke, S.B., 2011. Escalating land grabbing in post-conflict regions of Northern Uganda: A need for strengthening good land governance in Acholi Region. In: international conference on Global Land Grabbing. 6–8. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/

Samuel_Mabikke/publication/261805324_Escalating_Land_Grabbing_in_Postconflict_Regions_of_Northern_Uganda/links/02e7e5358cf6070c87000000.pdf

Mamdani, M., 1987. Extreme but not exceptional: Towards an analysis of the agrarian question in Uganda. The Journal of Peasant Studies, 14 (2), 191–225.

Mamdani, M., 1996. Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Pender, J., Jagger, P., Nkonya, E., and Sserunkuuma, D., 2004. Development Pathways and Land Management in Uganda. World Development, 32 (5), 767–792.

Pender, J., Nkonya, E., Jagger, P., Sserunkuuma, D., and Ssali, H., 2004. Strategies to increase agricultural productivity and reduce land degradation: evidence from Uganda. Agricultural Economics, 31 (2–3), 181–195.

Place, F. and Otsuka, K., 2002. Land Tenure Systems and Their Impacts on Agricultural Investments and Productivity in Uganda. The Journal of Development Studies, 38 (6), 105–128.

Rugadya, M., 2007. Gender in Uganda’s National Land Policy—Issues, Theories and Policy Responses: Implications for Poverty Social Impact Assessment in Uganda. Occasional Paper Kampala: Associates for Development.

Rugadya, M.A., 2009. Escalating Land Conflicts in Uganda: A review of evidence from recent studies and surveys. Report to the International Republican Institute and the Ugandan Round Table Foundation.

Rugadya, M.A., Nsamba-Gayiiya, E., and Kamusiime, H., 2008a. Northern Uganda land study analysis of post conflict land policy and land administration: a survey of IDP return and resettlement issues and lesson: Acholi and Lango regions. World Bank.

Rugadya, M.A., Nsamba-Gayiiya, E., and Kamusiime, H., 2008b. Analysis of Post Conflict Land Policy and Land Administration. A Survey of IDP Return and Resettlement Issues and Lessons: Acholi and Lango Regions. Washington, DC: The World Bank.

Rugadya, M., Obaikol, E., and Kamusiime, H., 2004. Gender and the land reform process in Uganda. Associates for Development. Online. Available from: http://mokoro.co.uk/wpcontent/uploads/gender_and_land_reform_process_uganda.pdf

Tripp, A.M., 2004. Women’s movements, customary law, and land rights in Africa: the case of Uganda. African Studies Quarterly, 7 (4), 1–19.

 

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